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The USB (Universal Serial Bus) is as relevant today as it was when the 12 millimeter by 4.5 millimeter ports and cables first started appearing back in the late 1990s, providing users with a discreet and straightforward way of transferring data between a range of digital devices.

Today, more than 10 billion USB devices are believed to be in use around the world.

I think what we did was we created an open standard that everybody can benefit. What I am happy to see is that everybody participates in this eco-system and they are all making money.

— USB co-inventor Ajay Bhatt in CNN report How USB Turned Intel’s Ajay Bhatt into a Rock Star

From USB to Ubiquitous Computing — a look at how Ajay Bhatt intends to reinvent the PC once again.

7. Use caution with holiday e-greetings and song lyrics

E-cards are a popular way to send a quick “thank you” or holiday greeting, but some may contain spyware or viruses that download onto your computer when you click on them. Always be careful what sites you access and what email links you click.

+ The supercomputer at the Thor Data Center is based on a cluster of 288 HP ProLiant BL280c servers. The Intel Xeon Processor L5530-powered cluster is comprised of 3,456 compute cores with 71.7 terabytes of usable storage, and pumps out 35 teraflops of performance.

While building and shipping the machine’s parts to Icelandic-produced CO2, the machine — and in fact all of Iceland — is powered 24/7/365 by a mix of nothing but renewable hydro and geothermal power. To light up Iceland’s electrical grid, no fossil fuels puff, smoke or burn.

The supercomputer at the Thor Data Center is based on a cluster of 288 HP ProLiant BL280c servers. The Intel Xeon Processor L5530-powered cluster is comprised of 3,456 compute cores with 71.7 terabytes of usable storage, and pumps out 35 teraflops of performance.

While building and shipping the machine’s parts to Icelandic-produced CO2, the machine — and in fact all of Iceland — is powered 24/7/365 by a mix of nothing but renewable hydro and geothermal power. To light up Iceland’s electrical grid, no fossil fuels puff, smoke or burn.

From farm boy to global chip head.
There’s little room for error when you are in charge of factory startups, thousands of engineers and technicians, and millions of dollars’ worth of tools that must work 24/7 so products can get in the hands of customers. Since 2008, Steve Megli has overseen thousands of Intel Assembly Test Manufacturing employees running factories in China, Malaysia, Costa Rica and Vietnam.

Megli grew up on a farm in Rock Falls, Ill., where he learned all about hard work. It was good preparation for a 25-year career with Intel’s Technology & Manufacturing Group, where today he’s a vice president and co-general manager of Assembly Test Manufacturing. Recently, Megli took a moment to talk about the need for so-called “possibility thinking” and how farming prepared him for Intel.

From farm boy to global chip head.

There’s little room for error when you are in charge of factory startups, thousands of engineers and technicians, and millions of dollars’ worth of tools that must work 24/7 so products can get in the hands of customers. Since 2008, Steve Megli has overseen thousands of Intel Assembly Test Manufacturing employees running factories in China, Malaysia, Costa Rica and Vietnam.

Megli grew up on a farm in Rock Falls, Ill., where he learned all about hard work. It was good preparation for a 25-year career with Intel’s Technology & Manufacturing Group, where today he’s a vice president and co-general manager of Assembly Test Manufacturing. Recently, Megli took a moment to talk about the need for so-called “possibility thinking” and how farming prepared him for Intel.

By day, Jeffrey Stephenson works as an information technology professional, but in his free time, he’s better known as “slipperyskip.” That’s his Twitter handle and the name he uses on computer hardware forums where he posts about how he transforms retro furniture and antique appliances — he once turned an Elvis microphone into a fully functioning PC. His handcrafted designs have made him a celebrity in many computer hardware circles and a living legend among PC modders.

"Sometimes an idea hits me that I just can’t shake," he said. "It starts to dominate my every thought until the only way to get rid of it is to act on it. The Shure 55 microphone is an example. The idea of using it in a computer design ran in the back of my head for nearly a year. One day it all clicked and I just started building what became the Unidyne PC.”

He believes that most people like their technology to look like technology. But that’s not his audience. “I speak to those who like to express their style in everything they come in contact with,” he said.

Stephenson built his first homemade PC when he was a teenager. “It was a Digicomp mechanical 3-bit computer, an educational toy designed to teach about binary numbers,” said Stephenson.

Since then he’s created 30 unique computers, each a masterpiece blending modern technology and design styles ranging from Art Deco to Mission to Mid-Century Modern. He has never sold any of them, but he did enter his Decomatic living room entertainment PC in the 2007 Intel PC Design Challenge. One of his biggest joys is when his wife uses his creations to decorate their Live Oak, Florida area home.

By day, Jeffrey Stephenson works as an information technology professional, but in his free time, he’s better known as “slipperyskip.” That’s his Twitter handle and the name he uses on computer hardware forums where he posts about how he transforms retro furniture and antique appliances — he once turned an Elvis microphone into a fully functioning PC. His handcrafted designs have made him a celebrity in many computer hardware circles and a living legend among PC modders.

"Sometimes an idea hits me that I just can’t shake," he said. "It starts to dominate my every thought until the only way to get rid of it is to act on it. The Shure 55 microphone is an example. The idea of using it in a computer design ran in the back of my head for nearly a year. One day it all clicked and I just started building what became the Unidyne PC.”

He believes that most people like their technology to look like technology. But that’s not his audience. “I speak to those who like to express their style in everything they come in contact with,” he said.

Stephenson built his first homemade PC when he was a teenager. “It was a Digicomp mechanical 3-bit computer, an educational toy designed to teach about binary numbers,” said Stephenson.

Since then he’s created 30 unique computers, each a masterpiece blending modern technology and design styles ranging from Art Deco to Mission to Mid-Century Modern. He has never sold any of them, but he did enter his Decomatic living room entertainment PC in the 2007 Intel PC Design Challenge. One of his biggest joys is when his wife uses his creations to decorate their Live Oak, Florida area home.

SSDs may be victorious on the ice, but they still have a way to go before they eclipse HDDs in the marketplace. According to market research firm iSuppli, second-quarter 2011 shipments of SSDs climbed “a hefty” 21.4 percent to 3.4 million units, but the market “faces the challenge of a crowded manufacturer base” and “teething pains on the way to becoming a stable market with healthy revenues and margins.”

+ jtotheizzoe:

Antikythera mechanism as luxury wristwatch
For your anachronistic bling needs.
(via Boing Boing)

Timewise riff off of this story: World’s First Computer May Be Older than You Think.

jtotheizzoe:

Antikythera mechanism as luxury wristwatch

For your anachronistic bling needs.

(via Boing Boing)

Timewise riff off of this story: World’s First Computer May Be Older than You Think.

The seeds of the digital revolution were planted with the invention of the transistor in 1947, which led to the integrated circuit in the late 1950s followed by the world’s first microprocessor in 1971 that later gave birth to the personal compute…

The seeds of the digital revolution were planted with the invention of the transistor in 1947, which led to the integrated circuit in the late 1950s followed by the world’s first microprocessor in 1971 that later gave birth to the personal compute…

+ "Kissing future prosperity goodbye." As the federal budget beadline nears, MIT President Susan Hockfield told the Commonwealth Club in Silicon Valley that she’s skeptical that Congress will avoid cutting funding for research by 10% for the next decade.
"It’s where big, new ideas get transformed into products that create new markets and put people to work," she said.

"Kissing future prosperity goodbye." As the federal budget beadline nears, MIT President Susan Hockfield told the Commonwealth Club in Silicon Valley that she’s skeptical that Congress will avoid cutting funding for research by 10% for the next decade.

"It’s where big, new ideas get transformed into products that create new markets and put people to work," she said.